Top 10 Best Low Light Hanging Plants Recommended by Garden Experts

There are just a few houseplants that can be kept in hanging baskets and thrive in low-light environments. To make things easier, we’ve compiled a list of the best ten options for low-light-loving hanging plants.

Some of them are:

  1. Tillandsia
  2. Monstera
  3. Pothos
  4. Peace Lily
  5. English Ivy

Read our article to find out 5 more!

Daniela Sawyer from FindPeopleFast.net

Phalaenopsis Orchids

One among those beautiful hanging plants. They often bloom, giving a lovely look to your room. Hang it on your balcony, which will be fantastic for those who view it from outside. Tiny little flowers are the main attraction. Keep the soil a little wet.

Tillandsia

This one can live without soil. It’s an excellent option for your living area. In total, it’s among those rare no-care plants.

Don’t hide it anywhere; hang it open and let people stare at its beauty. Occasional watering and light are enough for its better look.

Steven Emerson from Mobile Biponi

Monstera

I like looking at this hanging plant because it embodies that even though it is not perfect because of the big holes on its leaves, it is still beautiful, and it is well-loved.

This plant has taken the internet by storm. Though not the regular leafy hanging plant that we know, it has holes in its leaves that capture the observer’s attention.

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It grows in indirect light, so it is better placed inside the home. It doesn’t need much water, just enough when the topsoil is already dry.

David Levi from Cryptoner

Ponytail Palm

A member of the Agave family, the ponytail palm tree is succulent. It has bulbous trunks and long hair-like leaves that explains its name.

This plant is too straightforward to grow, as it only needs light half of the time. It can survive in a low light condition for half the year and is best in semi-dry conditions.

Place it atop the table, and keep in mind that letting the soil dry out is better in these kinds of plants. Also, let them get root bound before repotting.

Michael Dean from Pool Research

Pothos

Pothos is a beautiful small-medium-sized vining plant with heart-shaped petals. It’s perfect for hanging and does best in shady spots in your bathroom, bedroom or office.

It thrives when kept out of direct sunlight and should be watered whenever the soil is dry to the touch, usually every 1 to 2 weeks.

If any petals or stems dry up, remove them and relocate the plant if necessary. New stems and petals should grow back quickly.

Philodendron

Philodendron is often confused with Pothos because they look so similar, but they are different plants.

Philodendron has comparatively thinner leaves and tends to be a bit less resilient to low-light than Pothos. That said, they’re both easy-tend houseplants, and they both make excellent choices for a hanging basket.

Peace Lily

Peace Lily is ever famous for hanging baskets as it provides all the perks of the usual candidates above, but with the bonus of gorgeous flowers in rich foliage.

Peace Lily is undemanding, needing water only once every week to 2 weeks, and again is another which thrives in low indirect sunlight.

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Katie Hodge from Generator Magazine

Baby’s Tears and Spider Plant are all low light hanging plants adorned to beautify the house’s interior, purify the air by detoxifying it and increasing its oxygen content.

For their healthy growth, expose them to five to 6 hours of partial sunlight each day, hang them near a window.

You can maintain them by removing dead plant parts and keeping them in shape by occasionally cutting their irregular extensions. Water content should be such that it merely moistens the soil, avoid overwatering.

Jeremy Yamaguchi from Lawn Love

English Ivy

English Ivy does very well in low-light and is shockingly easy to care for. Even someone with a black thumb can manage to keep English Ivy alive. Just get a good hanging pot (plastic is fine) with a saucer on the bottom.

Water the ivy enough to make sure the soil is moist. Let it drain well and keep the plant in partial shade. If it starts to spill out too far over the container, trim back some of the ivy.

Conclusion

Above are our top low light hanging plants. Low-light-tolerant plants are useful in many indoor environments. You can’t go wrong when you combine that criteria with varieties that look great in hanging baskets and pots.

Good luck and see you in our next articles!

Top 10 Best Low Light Hanging Plants Recommended by Garden Experts
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Jill Sandy

I am a sustainable focus gardener. I love decorating my home backyard with beautiful landscape design and creative garden care techniques I develop myself.