How Fast Do Succulents Grow And Ways To Grow Them Even Faster

Succulents come in many varieties, but in general, how fast do succulents grow?

The growth rate of these plants depends on several factors such as sunlight, water, quality of soil, container, and the type of cactus you are planting.

There are slow-growing succulents such as Haworthias that often take a year or more to go from 2 inches to 5 inches in height.

Fast-growing plants like Echeveria, however, can grow from 2 inches to 6 to 8 inches in just one year.

The growth rate also depends on the type of propagation. Growing it from stem will take around 4 weeks or more before it starts to root. However, when cultivating succulents by root propagation, it will only take 21 to 28 days before new roots form.

If you choose to propagate these plants from leaves, you can see roots beginning to sprout even after two weeks.

How Fast Do Succulents Grow And Ways To Grow Them Even Faster

Fast Growing Succulent

You can see considerable growth for fast-growing succulents around 4 to 6 months and tiny development in just a few weeks to a month.

  • Aloe Vera
  • Crassula
  • Graptoveria
  • Echeveria
  • Century Plant or Agave
  • Stonecrop or Sedum
  • Graptosedum
  • Mother of Thousands or Kalanchoes

Slow Growing Succulent

These succulents grow so slowly that you will sometimes never notice their development.

  • Gasteria
  • Haworthia
  • Living Stones or Lithops
  • Air Plants or Tillandsia
  • Barrel Cactus or Ferocactus
  • Crinkle Leaf Plant or Adromischus Cristatus
How Fast Do Succulents Grow And Ways To Grow Them Even Faster

Succulent Dormancy

The dormancy phase of succulents is akin to the hibernation period of animals. It is when they grow much slower than they usually do. Some plants go dormant during the summer season while some enter a deep sleep when winter hits.

During this phase, succulents need a minimal amount of water.

Summer

Summer dormant succulents or winter growers are often Southern Hemisphere natives. They go undeveloped between May and August.

  • Aloe vera
  • Crassula
  • Ceraria
  • Gasteria
  • Gibbaeum
  • Graptoveria
  • Kalanchoe
  • Bowiea
  • Dioscorea
  • Bulbine
  • Dudleya
  • Tylecod
  • Talinum
  • Pelargonium
  • Pachyveria
  • Pachyphytum
  • Sedum
  • Sedeveria
  • Sempervivum
  • Sarcocaulon
  • Senecio
  • Peperomia
  • Sedum
  • Sansevieria

Winter

Winter dormant succulents or summer growers are usually Northern Hemisphere natives and are going through the phase from November to February.

  • Agave
  • Ficus
  • Adenium
  • Alluaudia
  • Bursera
  • Fockea
  • Ibervillea
  • Ipomoea
  • Didieria
  • Brachystelma
  • Euphorbia
  • Echeveria
  • Cissus
  • Plumeria
  • Moringa
  • Lithops
  • Tillandsia
  • Trichodiadema
  • Trichocaulon
  • Xerosicyos
  • Syndenium
  • Monadenium
  • Pedilanthus
  • Pterodiscu
  • Pachypodium
  • Pseudolithos
  • SiningiaRaphionacme
  • Stapelianthus
  • Sempervivum
  • Jatropha

How To Grow Succulent Faster?

Proper care is vital to growing succulents faster. They can be opportunistic and will grow best in favorable settings.

Right Pot

The best pot for growing succulents faster is one that offers excellent drainage and breathability like terracotta pots. Otherwise, plants can rot, especially when you water it regularly, and the container has a weak drainage system.

Good Soil

For all plants, good quality soil is essential for faster growth. For succulents, the right choice would be a well-draining soil mix. You can make your mix or purchase ready-made succulent and cactus soil mixes.

Proper Water Schedule

Succulents can survive without water for prolonged periods. But that doesn’t imply they don’t require it. If you want to grow plants faster, you have to adopt a proper water schedule. A common rule of thumb in watering plants is to hydrate them when the soil starts to feel dry.

Also, avoid watering the succulents directly as it may cause the leaves to rot.

Enough Light

Overall, like water, succulents don’t require a lot of sunlight. The amount of light for fast growth will depend on the type of plant. Some do well in little to no sunlight, while others will need a minimum of 6 hours under the sun.

A good indicator that your succulents need sun is when they start to stretch.

How Fast Do Succulents Grow And Ways To Grow Them Even Faster
Woman hand transplanting succulent in ceramic pot on the table. Concept of indoor garden home – Image

How Long Can You Keep Mini Succulents In Tiny Containers?

Mini succulents still grow, but they are slow growers, especially in the beginning. Once they reach maturity, you can expect their growth to skyrocket and outgrow their containers after some time.

At this time, confining mini succulents in small boxes slows down their growth. Once they achieve a specific size, it is critical to provide them with enough room to grow and spread out.

But ultimately, it will depend on your preference if you want them to stay small or grow more prominent. Mini succulents are sturdy plants. You can keep them in tiny boxes or pots for several weeks to a couple of months, or even for years.

However, there are cases when it is necessary to replant them in bigger pots like when they start to outgrow tiny containers. If you can spot roots growing out of the container or if the succulent begins spilling out of their boxes, the succulents now need repotting.

Conclusion

Not all succulents are the same. Each variety needs a different kind and amount of care. However, the growing environment, like the quality of soil, water, sunlight, and container, plays a vital role for succulents to grow faster.

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Jill Sandy

Jill Sandy

Jill is a sustainable focus gardener. She loves decorating her home backyard with beautiful landscape design and creative garden care techniques she develops herself. You can reach her at jill@constantdelights.org

Chanh Ho (MD, MPH)

Chanh Ho (MD, MPH)

Chanh is our Head of Medical Review. He is a research physician at Oxford University Clinical Research Unit. After accomplishing the program of level 1 sub-specialty in Pediatrics, he was awarded the Chevening Scholarship for his Master’s degree of Public Health in the University of Edinburgh in 2019

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